Woke Up In a Soho Doorway*

Posted: 14 August by Brett Hoover in Announcement
Tags: , , , , , ,


In February Fast Company ranked Quantcast — a media analytical tool for the web — as the third-most innovative company on the web, behind only Facebook and Google. So I decided to use it and see how the HepsTrack.com audience stood against other websites.

Get this, you are more educated than MENSA’s audience and wealthier than that of Forbes. In fact, this website’s visitors beat every site I looked at in things like percentage of college attendees, grad school attendees, those making $60,000 a year and those making $100k. And you are also younger than the audiences of the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal and even ESPN.

Here’s what I did. For the education and income measures, I removed the visitors who were below legal age and adjusted the percentages to reflect ‘of-age’ visitors and then compared them with ‘of-age’ visitors to other websites. You will see a table below that shows the comparison.

Here are some facts. More than 60 percent of the visits to this website come from regular visitors (which stacks up very favorably with other similar websites). For those of you who are 18 or older, eight-in-nine have been to college and nearly one-half of you haul in $100,000 annually. Very close to half of you are men (53 percent) and below the age of 35 (52 percent). A whopping 21 percent of you aren’t yet 18.

I look at other websites with similar traffic and weaker demographic data — like the Hockey Journal, the Baja Times and the Laguna Journal — and realize monetizing the site remains a viable option. So if you want to throw money my way, I will listen! Email me.

Website
College
Grad
>$60
>$100
< 35
Heps Track
87%
32%
81%
47%
52%
Official Ivy Universities
78%
28%
74%
40%
52%
New York Times
76%
33%
67%
40%
36%
Wall Street Journal
75%
31%
70%
40%
26%
MENSA
76%
27%
64%
33%
41%
Official BCS Conferences
74%
23%
72%
36%
34%
Forbes Magazine
71%
25%
69%
39%
34%
ESPN
66%
18%
70%
34%
45%

Key — College (College attendee), Grad (Graduate school attendee), >$60 (Making more than $60,000), >$100 (Making more than $100,000), < 35 (Under 35 years old)

* By the way, if you have no clue about the title of this post, click here.

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Comments
  1. Mary Boggs says:

    How does this tabulating website determine the details of the viewer (i.e. age and income)?

    • Brett says:

      Mary… I cannot necessary put this in English, but from Wikipedia…

      Instead participating websites voluntarily insert Quantcast HTML code inside Web pages they wish to have included in statistics. This code allows Quantcast to keep track of the traffic directed towards those Web sites.[4] Using this mechanism Quantcast can provide thorough details about Web pages created by participating publishers. Some of this information includes, for example, whether the Web page viewer is a male or female, whether the average viewer makes $30,000 USD annually or $100,000 USD annually, the age group of the viewer and the amount of U.S. homes the Web site reaches. This information is provided by inference: comparing and correlating the information received from one participating publisher with another. The inferences are possible because the Quantcast code causes the user’s browser to access Quantcast’s servers, at which time they can log the user’s IP address and information Quantcast places in cookies that are stored in the user’s browser. The cookies significantly aid in making inferences.

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